Research

My substantive research examines how interpersonal and environmental factors influence social attitudes, and in turn, how attitudes and identities influence social behavior. I also conduct work on applied quantitative methods.

INTERPERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTORS OF SOCIAL ATTITUDES
This line of research focuses on how interpersonal (e.g., contact with members of different racial groups) and environmental (e.g., racial diversity or racial segregation) factors shape implicit and explicit racial attitudes. This work suggests that people living in more racially diverse areas tend to have stronger preferences for members of their own racial group, at least to the extent that they live in segregated areas or have few interactions with members of different racial groups.

THE ROLE OF ATTITUDES AND IDENTITIES IN GUIDING SOCIAL BEHAVIOR
Using primarily developmental samples, this work examines how implicit and explicit attitudes and identities influence behavior. For example, my research through the TransYouth Project (directed by Kristina Olson) explored whether gender identification and preferences predict social transitions among gender nonconforming children. Collectively, this program of research shows that social attitudes and identities predict both everyday behaviors (e.g., ingroup favoritism), as well as previously unstudied behaviors (e.g., social transitions) that are at the heart of contentious scientific and public discourse.

APPLIED QUANTITATIVE METHODS
My applied quantitative research draws on my substantive research questions, as well as my teaching experience, to help others understand fundamental statistical concepts (e.g., statistical power) and cutting-edge computational science tools (e.g., R and Stan).